The Evolution of the Witcher 3: Wild Hunt

The Evolution of the Witcher 3: Wild Hunt

Fun fact: I was hoping to do a review on the game soon, but considering I’ve been playing eighty hours and I’m still not done with the first act, that clearly isn’t happening any time soon. Bless the hearts of anyone who reviewed this at release because I can’t imagine rushing this game. So far the scaling makes it possible to mainline the story quests, but why would you want to? Most of the character interactions and quest variety is in the details.

Like Assassin of Kings, Wild Hunt made a lot of effort to revamp a lot of aspects of the series. Some revert back to the original title, some meld both its predecessors, and some are all its own. Let’s go ahead and break it down.

This title adds in some missing open world concepts and basic logic. Players get a comprehensive world map with no limitations on travel. No long do you fail quests just for not finishing them in an unspecified time limit. So far quests tied to characters remain active–even after they leave the current area. With the increase in content, that’s appreciated. I could barely make sense of the proper order to finish quests in the previous titles; there’s no way I could do it now.

With these new, sprawling maps, you can fast travel. With the confined spaces and joy of exploration in the first two, I didn’t mind. But here the maps are so big that more of your time playing would consist of backtracking than anything else. You have to walk or ride your horse until you unlock an area’s signpost.

Same goes for searching all the question marks on the map. It feels like the game was jumbo-sized to offset this new convenience. I love it. I’ll fast travel to a nearby village or mountainside and clear out all the monster nests, abandoned sites, and hidden treasure.

Now that I’m done acting like the first person to ever play an open world game, let’s get to the systems that are constants in the series: alchemy, inventory, and combat.

Alchemy

The alchemy system is an odd one. It harks back to needing a strong alcohol base to make everything, but you only need to make bombs, blade oils, and potions once. After using the materials the first time, you’re given three to five uses depending on the recipes–normal, enhanced, and superior, respectively–and once these run out, you must meditate. If you still have alcohol in your inventory, the system replenishes your used items. It’s odd because I feel like I have better access to alchemy materials now that I don’t need as many.

You do have recipes for exhaustible items, but they are mainly for magical alchemy ingredients and some alcohol bases. It’s a weird circle, but I enjoy it. I get a big thrill from finally tracking down everything necessary for a new kind of bomb or a manuscript page for an upgraded potion.

Inventory

Now the inventory system is the love child of the first two in the series. The beautiful grid system is back, letting you better visualize what’s in your pockets. But you have unlimited slots, your capacity limited by the weight of the items instead–just like the second. You can carry more by using upgraded saddlebags, a weird one logically but is still useful. Still, I like it even with the weight component.

Combat

Now the combat is WONDERFUL–even with the group style still not making a comeback. You have your normal signs, fast and strong attacks, and wheel of doom a.k.a where you keep all the bombs. You can finally drink potions with a button press again, and you can use a crossbow to auto-target flying enemies. Dodging only takes two key presses in the direction you want to go. Honestly it is not all that different from the second game’s combat, but the few tweaks make it smoother and simpler.

An important PSA: only attempt to steal while breaking and entering. The guys won’t stop you from entering strange houses, but don’t you d are rifle through barrels in plain daylight. Finally the Witcher has added some logic to its looting. If a guard sees you pilfer a bottle of dwarven spirit, he will rain down his axe, but guards and home and store owners don’t mind you clearing out their entire inventory of broken oars and silver platters.

Also I hate water levels, just so you know.

Stay tuned.